August 29 – A Peek into Lamentations and Jeremiah 51-52

Jeremiah comes to a close – as we move forward into the book of Lamentations let me share with you a little background.

The identity of the author of the book of Lamentations is uncertain, but tradition points to Jeremiah, who is sometimes referred to as the “weeping prophet.”  Lamentations is a compilation of mournful poems (lamenting – hence the name Lamentations) about the people of Judah who had been taken into captivity in Babylon.

Remember God has warned the people that He will be sending invaders to conquer their city and nation as punishment for their continued rebellion and sin. Once in exile, the people wept and grieved for that which they have lost; their nation, the holy city of Jerusalem and the temple which has been destroyed. Through these chapters we will see, feel and experience their pain, their loss and their misery.

We will not only see the pain and misery, we will also find hope; hope for God’s people who He loves.  God’s love remained faithful and steadfast. He promises them that someday they will be restored.  Just as God’s love remained faithful and steadfast all those many centuries ago, it is the same for us today! No matter what we do, face, or experience His love and faithfulness to us, His children, will sustain us!

Tomorrow we begin reading Lamentations

Until next time – Be encouraged,

Sandra

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About Sandra

I became a writer in my later years. I love blogging and sharing life with others. I speak to women's groups about the Christian life.
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One Response to August 29 – A Peek into Lamentations and Jeremiah 51-52

  1. Jack Bass says:

    Jeremiah 51. This chapter is a bunch of prophecies against Babylon and also many references to the deliverance of Israel from captivity. Jeremiah is hard to understand because it jumps around so much. Many of what you read has already been spoken about in a previous book. Many Prophesies have already been seen in other books we have read. Mostly in Isiah. The last few verses tells the whole story. Verses 59 through 64 tells it all. This is the message Jeremiah the prophet gave to the staff officer Seraiah son of Neriah, the son of Mahseiah, when he went to Babylon with Zedekiah king of Judah in the fourth year of his reign. Jeremiah had written on a scroll about all the disasters that would come upon Babylon—all that had been recorded concerning Babylon. He said to Seraiah, “When you get to Babylon, see that you read all these words aloud. Then say, ‘Lord, you have said you will destroy this place, so that neither people nor animals will live in it; it will be desolate forever. When you finish reading this scroll, tie a stone to it and throw it into the Euphrates. Then say, ‘So will Babylon sink to rise no more because of the disaster I will bring on her. And her people will fall. The words of Jeremiah end here.

    Chapter 52. This chapter is close to being a rerun of chapter in 2 kings we have already read. Sorry I don’t remember the exact chapter. There are a few differences in this chapter. It tells us of Zedekiah being captured, The Temple being degraded, Zedekiah’s advisers being executed and also the record of Jehoiachins good treatment by the new King of Babylon. The book of Jeremiah started out very easy for me to read and understand but the last few chapters were duzzies and very hard for me to get the true meanings of it all. I will just keep reading and pray that God will reveal what he wants me to understand. God is good all the time and we need to keep that in mind. He loves us all just as much as he loves the chosen ones. In Christ, Jack.

    Father God I pray that you will reveal the true meaning of all I read as I go along with my reading of your Bible. I pray that you will give meaning to all the others in this group who have signed on to the reading through the Bible in a year. I seek your blessings on my church as well as our missionaries around the world. In Jesus name I pray. Amen.

    Like

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